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Thread: Blood type patches?

  1. #11
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    I-Ninja,

    FWIW I am also A POS. Just make sure that I am around when the SHTF.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iraq Ninja View Post
    Patches may be of use in 3rd world (turd world) countries where you may not have Uncle Sam near by. For instance, in the Middle East, B seems to be the most common type, and since I am A+, I can't use any B.

    I have friends working contracts here in Iraq where they are not DOD, and thus are forced to use the local medical sources if required. Not a good situation at all. Iraq is not at the forefront of medical care...

    NKA or known allergy patches are probably more important in situations where you are unable to get to some form of definitive care and a medic is possibly having to use an analgesic or antibiotic on you.

    Patches can be lost or removed. Using a sharpie is cheap and more durable.



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  2. #12
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    Ok. Indeed, pointless fashion accessory in the civilian world since no ER doc nor trauma surgeon is going to pay the slightest attention to any blood type information that doesn't come from their own lab. I can see the rationale in the narrow context of the special forces community, however.

  3. #13
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    having done two tours as a Military medical officer, it seems to be forgotten that the use of blood transfusions for military wounds is the exception rather than the rule. most wounded simply do not need blood and my aid station (not a hospital or fast team station) would simply stock a few units of o neg just in case. if you really need blood fast they will just grad o neg and give it -worrying about a type and cross later.

  4. #14
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    Funny. My unit, as retarded as it was, decided that the blood type was to go on the helmet band along with the name tape.

    And I see it more as another "that's my gear" thing than actual blood type use. No different than putting your last four on the inside of your hat.

    You could use blood type to differentiate between guys on leaders card without having to use their last four everywhere.

    Ex: Smith A Pos and Smith B Neg.

    ...

    As far as the 10% being inaccurate, that's government quality control at its finest.
    Last edited by StrikeFace; 08-19-10 at 16:37.
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  5. #15
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    ETA: My earlier comments are based on in-facility treatment, there is a SOF protocol for in field transfusion with pre-mission confirmed typing.
    Correct: Mike T

    The original concept was sound enough, as we first saw this emerge within the special operations community, where guys tended to work in small teams, in harm's way and in austere conditions. Knowing who else on the team might have a compatible blood type simply by sight was a legitimate benefit of this practice, but as with most things, conventional forces were quick to adopt it because of the perceived cool factor.
    Correct: Army Chief
    This line is useless and only takes up space. Im suppose to insert something here to validate my post on this site and/or to make myself look cooool. Rubbish. Im a nobody who loves shooting shit.

  6. #16
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    When I was a corpsman no one did it until we saw Blackhawk Down. Then it became all the rage. It looked...cool. Policy/directives came out that we would only use dog tags, but that didn't dissuade Marines (and corpsman) from doing it. I thought it was funny because pretty much if you were going to get blood it was going to be O neg anyway.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weaver View Post
    ...........EVERYONE gets typed/matched before receiving products - if it's an emergency, they will get O-NEG until their blood is typed,...........
    Oh yes, I can attest to that. I'm O [rh D] Neg.......oh did I have a nice time being called to the hospital every few months during one particular two year tour.

    It used to be the fashion amongst Brit Squaddies to have your type tattoed on your arm.
    Last edited by Von Rheydt; 08-19-10 at 20:17.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weaver View Post
    EVERYONE gets typed/matched before receiving products - if it's an emergency, they will get O-NEG until their blood is typed, but nobody will ever trust tags (which run about 10% error) or patches.
    This is what I have always thought. Thanks for clearing that up.

  9. #19
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    Does wearing a blood type patch hurt? Probably not, but I wouldnt expect medical treatment to be based on nylon and velcro either.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Von Rheydt View Post
    It used to be the fashion amongst Brit Squaddies to have your type tattoed on your arm.
    This is still the case in certain elite groups, but to my knowledge, it really started with the Waffen SS. At the time, Rh factors were still unknown, but the basic blood type (A, B ...) was tattoed on the inner left bicep. This unique identifying mark became something of a liability in the closing days of the war as Allied captors screened for this as a means of separating SS troopers (who often surrendered in regular Army uniforms to evade identification) from those of the regular Wehrmacht.

    AC
    Stand your ground; don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here. -- Captain John Parker, Lexington, 1775.

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