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Thread: Honest truth about ss barrels?

  1. #1
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    Honest truth about ss barrels?

    Hey guys. How long will new ss barrels last with their accuracy, say around 10k rounds with no significant accuracy loss?

    Thanks guys!
    Last edited by Secret; 01-25-11 at 00:10.

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    It really depends on things like operating temp/enviroment & usage, fire rate, ammo etc.

    If you are buying a SS barrel, I doubt you are doing select fire mag dumps with c-mags while suppressed. If you are, I would go with a chrome lined barrel.

    I don't think 10k isn't unrealistic from a high quality SS barrel from Noveske or the like. John Noveske says his polygonal rifiling will have a predictable end of service life. Groups will gradually get bigger before tumbling bullets.

    Some of the high quality chrome lined barrels are capable of 1.5 moa accuracy with good ammo.

    A Noveske with good ammo is capable of sub moa accuracy.

    When selecting a barrel, you also need to factor in what kind of ammo you're going to be shooting. Having a sub moa SS barrel and all the tight group gizmos you can find, won't do you a bit of good shooting Wolf.

    If you want a high level of accuracy, you're going to pay for it, both in equipment and ammunition.

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    Ah thank you! look like ill be looking at the centurion barrels then!!

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    It’s interesting to note that Rogers witnessed someone use a Noveske Rifleworks 10.5-inch CQB barrel/KFH combo in three classes over a three month period. Over the three-course training package, the student fired 7,730 rounds of 5.56×45mm ammo comprised of NATO M855 (62-grainer), Black Hills 77-grain MK262 MOD 1, Hornady 75-grain TAP rounds, and commercial 55-grain ball, and ended up firing over 10,000 rounds total without any "discernable" loss in accuracy. That’s pretty good. Rogers also mentioned that a second shooter put over 4,000 rounds through his CQB barrel over a two-week period without any noticeable accuracy degredation.
    http://www.defensereview.com/noveske...ets-the-krink/

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    10,000 rounds, maybe more.

    Centurion makes good barrels. Some people think they're as good as Noveske.
    Last edited by Hmac; 01-25-11 at 15:06.

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    really depends on the caliber you pick. we are assuming you are talking 5.56/.223 in which case you are probably good for 5k-10K rounds depending on how hard you push them, how hot you shoot the barrel etc.

    if we're talking a .243 you may get 2K out of it but .243s will erode the throat at 1500 or so.

    a SS will give you a longer wear life than normal steel I think but it's highly dependent on the caliber you pick, how fast you push that caliber, how you care for the barrel (keeping it cool or shooting it to very high heat often_) cleaning regimen etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by goneballistic View Post
    a SS will give you a longer wear life than normal steel I think but it's highly dependent on the caliber you pick, how fast you push that caliber, how you care for the barrel (keeping it cool or shooting it to very high heat often_) cleaning regimen etc.
    Assuming using the rifle as a precision rifle 80% of the time plus a little rapid fire (one or two carbine courses) would you say the 10,000 round estimate would work.

    Also, what kind of cleaning regimen would prolong barrel life? I can see this going both ways as too much cleaning would erode the barrel as would allowing it to build up too much fouling
    “The ruling class doesn’t care about public safety. Having made it very difficult for States and localities to police themselves, having left ordinary citizens with no choice but to protect themselves as best they can, they now try to take our guns away. In fact they blame us and our guns for crime. This is so wrong that it cannot be an honest mistake.” – former U.S. Sen. Malcolm Wallop (R-Wy.)

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    A good coated one piece rod, a bore guide is a must. Absolutely no stainless steel brushes in a stainless barrel.

    The trick with cleaning is to let your solvents do the work. The mechanical action of cleaning can damage your barrel. Let the chemicals do the work. Use good stuff. KG, Slip etc.

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    I would say 10,000 plus easy.

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    this is just my opinion, but i think most people getting stainless barrels would be better served with a good quality CMV barrel. i think the vast majority of stainless-barreled guns are not used for anything close to true precision work, and their owners aren't even capable of putting the rifle to precision use- either because they simply aren't going to have any training interest, they don't actually even really shoot much, or simply aren't capable of shooting better than about 1.5MOA even on a good day, regardless of barrel.

    and since 1.5MOA is pretty common for good quality CMV barrels these days, and since 1.5MOA is plenty precise enough for basically any combat scenario out to 600m+, and since CMV barrels can take SO much more abuse than stainless barrels, can handle being shot fast and hot without the rapid degradation of hot stainless barrels, i really think the vast majority of people asking this question need to fully assess their wants and needs.

    if you want a combat gun and combat accuracy, stainless is a waste. if the difference between .75 and 1.5 MOA should happen to actually make a real difference to you, then stainless is appropriate. but be honest with yourself (ambiguous).

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