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Thread: Tips for shooting the IDPA classifer

  1. #21
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    Thanks for the tips. I need to practice more to make better than Sharpshooter in SSP and CDP in IDPA. You just can not use the matches as your practice.

    Czar

  2. #22
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    Dry fire should be part of any practice regimen. It was an important part of my training to make IDPA Master. I made a commitment to do dry fire daily for 1000 consecutive days, finished it, and have always been glad I did it.

    Here is a basic practice session and some considerations for safe dry fire training.
    This session will take 10-15 minutes. Avoid becoming fatigued and ingraining bad habits.

    Basic Dry Fire Practice Drills

    Basic Dry Fire Practice Session
    Trigger Press Practice - Freestyle 5 reps
    Presentation from Low Ready - Freestyle 5 reps
    Draw from Open Holster - Freestyle 5 reps
    Draw from Concealed Holster - Freestyle 5 reps
    Trigger Press Practice - Strong Hand Only 5 reps
    Draw from Open Holster - Strong Hand Only 5 reps
    Trigger Press Practice - Weak Hand Only 5 reps
    Presentation from Low Ready - Weak Hand Only 5 reps
    Draw from Concealed Holster - Strong Hand Only 5 reps
    Slide-lock Reload 5 reps
    Trigger Press Practice - Freestyle 5 reps

    Dry fire practice can be extremely dangerous if proper safety procedures are not followed.
    Always observe the Four Rules of Safe Gunhandling

    Four Rules of Safe Gunhandling
    All guns are always loaded
    Never point a gun at anything you are not prepared to destroy
    Keep your finger out of the trigger guard until your sights are on the target
    Know your target and what is beyond it

    Dry Fire Safety Procedures
    Dry fire ONLY when you are alert and focused
    Unload your pistol in an area other than the practice area - do not take any ammunition with you to the practice area
    Go to your practice area where there is NO LIVE AMMUNITION
    Check your pistol again to ensure that there is no ammunition in the pistol or any magazines you will use for practice
    Dry fire practice only on a specific dry fire target which is used only for dry fire practice
    Place your dry fire target against a bullet resistant wall, e.g., brick or concrete block
    If a bullet resistant wall is not available the target should be backed by a body armor panel capable of containing a bullet from your pistol
    Do not allow yourself to be disturbed during dry fire practice
    Wear eye protection when dry firing in case of a Negligent Discharge
    If you use dummy ammunition during dry fire, use ONLY commercially manufactured, easily identifiable dummies. Homemade dummies are unsafe and can result in death or serious injury.
    When you are finished practicing, put your target and pistol away immediately and do some other action that will remove dry fire from your thoughts. Do NOT immediately reload your pistol.
    Failure to follow these procedures EXACTLY can result in legal liability, property damage, serious injury, or DEATH.
    It's only an "arm's length" gun if you're incompetent.

  3. #23
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    If they had this kind of stuff here in hawaii my dream would come true.. I have been really working on my match shooting but there is no matches here to shoot.. I have a pretty good rifle set up and I would like to put it to good use.. only thing I really need is a Single stage match triger.. The one that came on my Armalite is 90% better then other stock triggers but still I would like a single stage with less weight..

  4. #24
    ToddG Guest
    I just shot the Classifier a couple weeks ago for the first time in about five years. Scored an 80.85, total of ten points down. I also got to watch a dozen other shooters ranging from Novice to Expert run the stages. Some random thoughts:

    • Strategies that work for a Master-class shooter are different than those that work for a MM-class shooter. Failing to realize, understand, and accept this truism is what keeps many people stuck at the MM/SS level.
    • Never miss a head shot. You shoot a total of nine head shots from a range of just 7 yd. The head on an IPDA target is huge-mongous(TM). If you can't hit the head in 1-2 seconds per shot at that range, then you are not ready to be shooting IDPA.
    • Be accurate but don't go so slowly that you shoot zero down on every target every string. Especially at the longer distances, dropping a point or two here and there can be worth what you gain in speed.
    • Know how to perform a proper reload. The number of people who consider themselves "serious" shooters who are absolutely in left field when it comes to reload technique is unbelievable. Reloads should be smooth and efficient. When they're on the clock, you should try to do them quickly. Shooting fast and then performing your reloads at a casual pace is just dumb.
    • Speaking of casual pace, there is exactly one string in the Classifier where you need to move quickly: Stage 3, String 2. When you move from the barricade to the barrel, RUN. Why in hell do some people just walk? The extra two or three seconds it takes you to move from Point A to Point B is reflected in your score.
    • There are two strings in the Classifier where you do not need to move quickly: Stage 2, Strings 1 & 2 (shooting while advancing, shooting while retreating). This is a game, not a gunfight. Focus 100% on your shooting and let your feet move as slowly as necessary to maximize your ability to deliver fast, accurate hits. I probably don't take three whole steps for either string, yet I'm still moving for every shot fired. Those are the rules, follow them.
    • Always start a string with your eyes on the target you are going to shoot first; whenever possible, have your torso turned toward that target. But keep your feet pointed toward the center of the target array (except for the first three strings in which you only engage one target; then have your whole body pointed at that one target before the buzzer goes off).
    • Don't hammer at the targets. Firing two lightning-fast shots makes it much harder/slower for most people to perform a smooth & fast transition to the next target. Giving up a few hundredths on your splits will gain you a couple tenths on your transitions. It's a good trade.
    • Perform a Tactical Reload (not Reload with Retention) on Stage 3 String 2, and the moment your fresh magazine is seated start sprinting towards the barrel. Get the spare mag stowed as you run.
    • Don't wear concealment. The idea of the Classifier is to compare apples to apples. The standards are based on shooting without concealment. If you wear a vest or shirt over your gun, you're really just sandbagging.
    • A lot of people like to follow a well thought out plan regarding how many rounds are in each magazine so that each stage works out just right. My advice: don't. Unless a string specifically requires you to start with a certain number of rounds in the gun, always start with the maximum allowed. Always have the maximum allowed in your spares. (a) This gives a little extra weight to the gun, reducing muzzle flip. (b) This will make your mags drop free faster and more reliably. (c) You will drastically reduce the odds of frakking up and having the wrong number of rounds in the gun. (d) You will have extra rounds in case you need to clear a stoppage.
    • Remember that it is just a game. The Classifier is actually a very good test of lots of shooting fundamentals, but it's controlled by a set of rules that reward and penalize certain things that have no relevancy to real life.

  5. #25
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddG View Post
    I just shot the Classifier a couple weeks ago for the first time in about five years. Scored an 80.85, total of ten points down. I also got to watch a dozen other shooters ranging from Novice to Expert run the stages. Some random thoughts:

    • Strategies that work for a Master-class shooter are different than those that work for a MM-class shooter. Failing to realize, understand, and accept this truism is what keeps many people stuck at the MM/SS level.
    • Never miss a head shot. You shoot a total of nine head shots from a range of just 7 yd. The head on an IPDA target is huge-mongous(TM). If you can't hit the head in 1-2 seconds per shot at that range, then you are not ready to be shooting IDPA.
    • Be accurate but don't go so slowly that you shoot zero down on every target every string. Especially at the longer distances, dropping a point or two here and there can be worth what you gain in speed.
    • Know how to perform a proper reload. The number of people who consider themselves "serious" shooters who are absolutely in left field when it comes to reload technique is unbelievable. Reloads should be smooth and efficient. When they're on the clock, you should try to do them quickly. Shooting fast and then performing your reloads at a casual pace is just dumb.
    • Speaking of casual pace, there is exactly one string in the Classifier where you need to move quickly: Stage 3, String 2. When you move from the barricade to the barrel, RUN. Why in hell do some people just walk? The extra two or three seconds it takes you to move from Point A to Point B is reflected in your score.
    • There are two strings in the Classifier where you do not need to move quickly: Stage 2, Strings 1 & 2 (shooting while advancing, shooting while retreating). This is a game, not a gunfight. Focus 100% on your shooting and let your feet move as slowly as necessary to maximize your ability to deliver fast, accurate hits. I probably don't take three whole steps for either string, yet I'm still moving for every shot fired. Those are the rules, follow them.
    • Always start a string with your eyes on the target you are going to shoot first; whenever possible, have your torso turned toward that target. But keep your feet pointed toward the center of the target array (except for the first three strings in which you only engage one target; then have your whole body pointed at that one target before the buzzer goes off).
    • Don't hammer at the targets. Firing two lightning-fast shots makes it much harder/slower for most people to perform a smooth & fast transition to the next target. Giving up a few hundredths on your splits will gain you a couple tenths on your transitions. It's a good trade.
    • Perform a Tactical Reload (not Reload with Retention) on Stage 3 String 2, and the moment your fresh magazine is seated start sprinting towards the barrel. Get the spare mag stowed as you run.
    • Don't wear concealment. The idea of the Classifier is to compare apples to apples. The standards are based on shooting without concealment. If you wear a vest or shirt over your gun, you're really just sandbagging.
    • A lot of people like to follow a well thought out plan regarding how many rounds are in each magazine so that each stage works out just right. My advice: don't. Unless a string specifically requires you to start with a certain number of rounds in the gun, always start with the maximum allowed. Always have the maximum allowed in your spares. (a) This gives a little extra weight to the gun, reducing muzzle flip. (b) This will make your mags drop free faster and more reliably. (c) You will drastically reduce the odds of frakking up and having the wrong number of rounds in the gun. (d) You will have extra rounds in case you need to clear a stoppage.
    • Remember that it is just a game. The Classifier is actually a very good test of lots of shooting fundamentals, but it's controlled by a set of rules that reward and penalize certain things that have no relevancy to real life.
    I really compliment you on your observations. Good advice and something worth saving for reference. (insert applause here)

  6. #26
    ToddG Guest
    Sidewinder -- Thanks. I'm usually very shy with my thoughts and opinions.

    gotM4 -- There's no way you'd fail to make Master now, dude. All the little gamey things you already know. Beyond that, it's just a matter of finding the right balance between speed & accuracy.

  7. #27
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    Thanks for posting this. It'll be a big help to those that are just starting out.

  8. #28
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    that is a lot of good advice guys. last week i went to my gun club to watch the idpa in person and was highly impressed. i already did the research in the rules and watching matches on youtube and stuff like that. i am going to sign up for membership after i go to a clinic that they are holding at my local range. while it looks fun and it is competition, i saw it more as another avenue to apply my skills learned and would consider it training to some extent. another thing i liked was that you can use your duty rig (mil/ le). once again, lots of good info. thanks.
    "Our Country won't go on forever, if we stay soft as we are now. There won't
    be any AMERICA because some foreign soldiery will invade us and take our
    women and breed a hardier race!"

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeadHunter View Post
    Homemade dummies are unsafe
    I think not.

    But I am interested in understanding why you do.

    Good thread. Learning a lot as an IDPA newbie.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANGER CLOSE View Post
    that is a lot of good advice guys. last week i went to my gun club to watch the idpa in person and was highly impressed. i already did the research in the rules and watching matches on youtube and stuff like that. i am going to sign up for membership after i go to a clinic that they are holding at my local range. while it looks fun and it is competition, i saw it more as another avenue to apply my skills learned and would consider it training to some extent. another thing i liked was that you can use your duty rig (mil/ le). once again, lots of good info. thanks.
    You will have a blast ( OK OK bad joke). Kidding aside, your worse possible moment at an IDPA match beats pushing a keyboard in a windowless room any day. The advice in this thread is really good. You can download the book off the IDPA site and it only takes one trip to the john to get through it end to end. Our club has the full range of members and it is a nice way to spend a day at the range.

    Good luck.

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