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Thread: Recommend kerosene lanterns for indoors

  1. #1
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    Recommend kerosene lanterns for indoors

    I have been shopping for emergency kerosene lanterns/lamps for power outage.

    Anyone have recommendations?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Good question, as I am interested too.

    On the subject, does kerosene create any harmful byproducts such as carbon monoxide when burned indoors?
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    Last edited by PlatoCATM; 07-26-11 at 21:56.

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    Dietz is the original, be sure to get name brand dietz. There are many chinese knock offs of these lamps and they are quite dangerous. I have a case study somewhere about a tourist that died in Australia I believe when a knock off kero lantern exploded at a rustic resort they were at and the resulting burns ended up being fatal. The survival school I teach for in Central America will only use authentic Dietz because they have reliably worked for decades.

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    Sorry for the long post but I wanted to give a thorough review of what I know since I researched this extensively in the past & have some experience here.

    I own a very simple, unelaborate Aladdin lamp , (similar to this one http://www.aladdinlamps.com/Product_...?StockID=C6193) with a mantle for nearly 20 years. It's part of my hurricane/survival gear for here in south FL. Have used it many times but in particular, Hurricane Wilma had me without power for 2 weeks and this was used every night. Home page: http://www.aladdinlamps.com/Index.asp
    I have never owned a Dietz. They may be great I just don't.

    What I do know is that while an Aladdin lamp is not pressurized, the mantle of an Alladin lamp is made of special material that incandesce's (glows) to produce approx the equivalent of 60 watt bulb which is like no other lamp that I am aware of when I researched lamps. In comparison, most kerosene lamps will only produce the equivalent of about 5-12 watts of light. I searched but I could not find anything referencing the output of Dietz lanterns so we could compare.

    I also know that the Dietz lamps do not recommend kerosene (not even K-1) for indoor use which is what the OP asked about, only for use outdoors. http://www.lanternnet.com/faqs.htm
    This is most likely because they do not burn hot enough to burn off any odor and the lack of "hottness" will cause a kerosene lamp to give off more black soot residue which is noxious and which an Aladdin will not do. There is no odor at all (or it is extremely minimal) and kerosene is the only recommended fuel for an Aladdin lamp. http://www.aladdinlamps.com/ViewPage.asp?PageID=2. Use of kerosene in any lamp other than an Aladdin will probably require adequate ventilation and will probably leave a black soot residue on walls and ceilings with much use. Kerosene lamps can be very dirty. This absolutely was not for me which is why I went the Aladdin route, along with the brightest output available that I could find.

    Here's a study on keorsene lamps for devoloping countries dated 2003. No sure if it will help but it may. http://evanmills.lbl.gov/pubs/pdf/offgrid-lighting.pdf
    One noteworthy point I took away was that the larger wicks (22mm) obviously burnt the brightest. The Aladdins have a 1" wick underneath the mantle which is equivalent to 22 mm.

    This is what wikipedia had to say http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerosene_lamp

    I will say that the Aladddins are more delicate and fragile (especially the chimney's) and not suitable for outdoor use. A Dietz looks much more rugged like your typical camp lantern. So depending on your use an Aladdin may not be suitable. Aladdins also put out a lot of heat and will warm a room. In my research and experience from what I have found, there is nothing like an Aladdin lamp on the market today. The closest thing (but brighter yet) would be a Coleman pressurized lantern that uses Coleman fuel or white gas, which is definetly not safe for indoor use due to its pressurization and highly combustible white gas. I'm always wanting to learn so if anyone knows of any advancements please let me know.
    Last edited by Just a Jarhead; 07-27-11 at 08:14.

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    Kerosene is a carbon based fuel, more a sibling to Diesel than a cousin. Burning kerosene gives off the same carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. I would not recommend burning kerosene lanterns indoors.

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    I mostly use Ultra Pure lamp oil (liquid paraffin) & have several gallon cans of K-1 as a back up. Lamp oil is in the same family as kerosene, but it has been purified to make it burn cleanly. The burning of lamp oil produces fewer pollutants than burning kerosene. It is more expensive though. If burning K-1 I would definitely have a window cracked.

    Otherwise, millions of people across this country lit their homes with Aladdin lamps using kerosene prior to the widespread adaptation of electricity with no ill effect. It was the most popular lamp in the nation for decades. The Aladdin mantle burns the impurities that standard wick lamps put into the air.

    ETA: The Aladdin website will tell you not to use lamp oil, ultra pure or otherwise and to use only K-1 kerosene. When I bought my Aladdin they actually recommended Ultra pure. They have since changed this due to wicks clogging (paraffin) and pooling. I can attest, and others will also if you do a google search, that we have had no ill effects with the operation of our lamps, ie. wicks clogging, pooling etc, using ultra pure lamp oil and I will continue to use it as long as my supply last at which time I'll switch to K-1 kerosene. When I used my lamp it was typically for 4 hours at a time. Aladdin now sells a very clean kerosene through it's Dealers which I have not tried yet. Cleaner than K-1 they claim. Think I'll pick some up today. There's a Dealer close by. If anyone gets an Aladdin get an extra (or 2) mantles, wicks, chimney's.

    ETA: probably a good idea to have a window cracked no matter what since the flame of any sort is sucking the oxygen from the room. At least if the flame gets dim, open a window.
    Last edited by Just a Jarhead; 07-27-11 at 11:36.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kmrtnsn View Post
    Kerosene is a carbon based fuel, more a sibling to Diesel than a cousin. Burning kerosene gives off the same carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. I would not recommend burning kerosene lanterns indoors.
    So much for my NG water heater and stove..

    CO and CO2 are a produced by any thing that burns. Proper ventilation, is a clue.

    Kerosene lanterns have and will be used for years with no ill affects.

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    Cover,

    Is there an adverse smell to the kerosene laterns? We used kerosene heater on the farm and I would prefer not to have that smell anywhere in a dwelling. I'm just curious if they would be similar...

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    I also recommend Aladdin lamps. I have several and use them in the winter months every day. Not only do they put off excellent lighting, they also produce a nice low heat.
    The only time that there is a strong smell of kerosene is if the lantern runs out of fuel, otherwise the odor is negligible.
    If you choose to buy Aladdin lamps, do yourself a favor and stock up on extra mantles. Some mantles seem to last for years, others can have a short life and disintegrate if the lantern is bumped. The mantles are very delicate once they are put in use.

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